Inside Teenage Brain: Explaining Risky Behavior

    Florida State University College of Medicine Neuroscientist Pradeep Bhide brought together some of the world’s foremost researchers in a quest to explain why teenagers — boys, in particular — often More »

Death of the computer mouse? Meet the 3DTouch

  When we use a computer mouse, we’re limited to two-dimensional movements. But what if we had the ability to interact with our computers in a three-dimensional fashion? Anh Nguyen and Amy More »

Insect Diversity Is Abundant in GM Maize Fields

The study is described in an article called “Comparative Diversity of Arthropods on Bt Maize and Non-Bt Maize in two Different Cropping Systems in South Africa,” which appears in the February 2014 More »

Why Do Migrating Birds Fly in V-Formation?

The research, led by the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, proves for the first time that birds precisely time when they flap their wings and position themselves in aerodynamic optimal positions, More »

62 Indians shortlisted for one-way Mars trip in 2024

Over 1,000 aspirants, including 62 from India, have been shortlisted for an ambitious private mission to send four men and women on a one-way trip to Mars in 2024 to establish a More »

 

Human Genome Shaped by Arms Race With Itself

The arms race is between mobile DNA sequences known as “retrotransposons” (a.k.a. “jumping genes”) and the genes that have evolved to control them. The UC Santa Cruz researchers have, for the first time, identified genes in humans that make repressor proteins to shut down specific jumping genes. The researchers also traced the rapid evolution of the repressor genes in the primate lineage.

Their findings, published September 28 in Nature, show that over evolutionary time, primate genomes have undergone repeated episodes in which mutations in jumping genes allowed them to escape repression, which drove the evolution of new repressor genes, and so on. Furthermore, their findings suggest that repressor genes that originally

Our brains can make decisions while we’re sleeping

 

shutterstock_65181187_1

A new study led by senior research scientist Sid Kouider and PhD student Thomas Andrillon at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris in France has investigated how active our brains a

Tonsil stem cells could help repair liver damage without surgery

 

shutterstock_127670198_web

 

At the moment, when our livers fail the only option is to perform a partial or complete transplant. Not only this costly and inherently risky, it’s also not always possible – there are far more patients needing liver transplants than donors.

But now South Korean scientists have discovered a new technique that could allow doctors to inject stem cells from the tonsils into the liver to repair damage – all without surgery.

Scientists have already started taking